WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT MARIJUANA LEGALIZATION IN ILLINOIS

Answers to frequently asked questions about Illinois’ cannabis legalization law.

Illinois became the 11th state to legalize recreational marijuana for adult use, after Gov. J.B. Pritzker in June signed the bill into law that takes effect today.

Here are the answers to commonly asked questions about what the new law means for Illinoisans:

When can I buy marijuana in Illinois?

Consumers can buy marijuana for recreational use from licensed sellers, as of Jan. 1, 2020.

Who can sell marijuana legally?

Medical marijuana dispensaries are the only legal sellers of marijuana for recreational use in January 2020. Beginning in mid-2020, Illinois will grant additional licenses to dozens of new stores, processors, cultivators and transporters.

Up to 295 stores could be in operation in Illinois by 2022, according to Marijuana Business Daily. But county and municipal governments will have the power to decide whether to allow sellers to operate in their area.

How much can I possess?

Illinoisans can legally possess 30 grams, or about an ounce, of cannabis flower. The legal limit for cannabis concentrate is 5 grams. And the limit for cannabis-infused products, such as edibles or tinctures, is 500 milligrams of THC, the chemical that gets users high. Illinois visitors are allowed to possess half of those amounts.

Palatine Man Found Not Guilty at One-Punch Murder Trial

Attorney Sam L. Amirante and Associate attorney Pam Curran proved that the evidence provided by the State did not warrant a First-Degree murder charge for this case. The jury deliberated and came back with a verdict of Not-Guilty of First-Degree murder. 

“Defense attorney Sam Amirante, in his closing arguments, said prosecutors failed to prove that Platt’s actions amounted to first-degree murder. Amirante went for an all-or-nothing verdict, meaning jurors were not given the choice of finding Platt guilty of a lesser crime. Therefore, Platt, who had been out of jail on bond while he awaited trial, walked away free on Friday after the verdict.”  
– Chicago Tribune, June 5, 2015